Trevor Wiggins Ghana Music Collection

Nandom young players, Braima Pikyulo, Vitus Dibbin, John Bosco Antare, Kog Yawra, Vuukang Domper and Miller Kpee

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  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    01:59:55

  • Shelf mark

    C791/9

  • Subjects

    Xylophones

  • Recording date

    1995-01-28

  • Is part of (Collection)

    Trevor Wiggins Ghanaian Music Collection

  • Recording locations

    Ghana, Upper West Region, Lawra District, Nandom

  • Performers

    Pikyulo, Braima, Dibbin, Vitus, Antare, John Bosco, Yawra, Kog, Domper, Vuukang, Kpee, Miller

  • Recordist

    Wiggins, Trevor

  • Abstract

    (19) Nandomme wa yire yee. Dome yaga, dome yaga yee, dome yaga. - End - (20) Nandomme Naa yela ye maali, maali, maali. Lit: The Nandom Naa is saying come together, come together, come together. It is good to unite together and contribute to build up the place. Meaning: The chief of Nandom has called on people to come together to build. Notes: Written by the Nandom Sekpere group to publicise the advice which Polkkuu was always giving. (21) Fu na be ter bagngman kuora, e bobr a pogbe. Lit: You don't have strong arms to farm, and you are looking for women,(repeated), looking for women, when women come. What will you do? Meaning: You are not strong enough to farm, so how can you support a wife. Notes: 1970's from Tuoper. (22) Fuu wa ter pog sig-kpe (Dance). Lit: Come and join if you have a wife. (23) Nandom na nume le a kang tuo kyen nyin. Lit: As Nandom is sweet, who will go where? (24) Sebro bambala wele, sebro naa nang be wa. Lit: Dancing they blow the big flute, dancing chief has not come. Meaning: The large flute (wele) has sounded, but the the chief dancer has not come Notes: Composed by Mamaa Borro who was as the time, the chief for the youth of Nandom in the late 1950's. Mamaa Borro died over 30 years ago. (25) Kpere bandazuzie (dance). Lit: Shake your head, [name of the lizard]. Meaning: Stand and dance like the lizard. Notes: Fast bewaa. A dance section which can be used with a number of songs e.g. Sebro bambala wele. The words would not be sung as the gyil player would improvise around the tune while everyone danced. Composed during 1960's. (26) Kpaa ngmaa pogmole ben Tuopare (song & dance). Meaning: If you are ugly or have something wrong with you, you can get a cheap girl to marry at Tuoper market. Notes: An old song composed by people from Guo (1 mile beyond Tuoper from Nandom). Tuoper market was one of the biggest in the area and there were always young men and women there looking for a marriage partner. It was said that there were so many girls that even if you only had 10kobo (Nigerian word for pennies) you could find a girl to marry. Kpaa ngmaa literally means "short back of the head." (27) Nandom na nume le a kang tuo kyen nyin. Lit: As Nandom is sweet, who will go where? (28) Pogli vila ta tuur nibe i bewaa woo. Lit: Beautiful girl don't insult people bɛwaa dance ground. Since you are beautiful you will die bɛwaa dance ground. Meaning: Even though you are beautiful you should not insult people at the bewaa dance (and other places) - you too will die one day. Notes: Use for Bewaa and Kari. (29) Pogle ter bu kang n zeli o sib (dance). Lit: The girl has something, I beg, she refused. Meaning: The girl has something I want (her favour) but when I begged she refused to give it to me Notes: Fast bewaa. Can go with e.g. Sɛbro bambala wele. This is a dance rather than a song as such. The dance is for lovers and couples together. The words were added later to identify the dance and make the couples laugh. Nkrumah's time. (30) Kontome de libie anuu (dance). Lit: The fairies white cowries five. Meaning: The fairies should take five white cowrie shells [to let you dance well]. Notes: From Dumanje. From Gegenkpe. (31) Pogle ter bu kang n zeli o sib (dance). Lit: The girl has something, I beg, she refused. Meaning: The girl has something I want (her favour) but when I begged she refused to give it to me. Notes: Fast bɛwaa. Can go with e.g. Sɛbro bambala wele. This is a dance rather than a song as such. The dance is for lovers and couples together. The words were added later to identify the dance and make the couples laugh. Nkrumah's time. (32) Nandomme biiri ni yangme korkor. Lit: The people of Nandom large population, The enemies pass through and destroy all of them, death, death, death. Meaning: Death comes to everyone. although Nandom has a large population everyone will die at some time. The dancers would be singing, smiling and waving while singing "Death". The song was in memory of one of the group, Kuim Dzang, who was a very good dancer and had recently died although still a pupil at Nandom Secondary school. Notes: Slow bewaa. February 1970. Composed by Bangnido? and used as the exit song for many performances. - End- (33) Nmaa wo na wa kume buule. N yi yeng ti seb bewaa. Lit: Oh mother, come and give me the jingles. I will go out and dance bewaa. Notes: Old song. From Tom. (34) Pogli vila ta tuur nibe i bewaa woo. Lit: Beautiful girl don't insult people bewaa dance ground. Since you are beautiful you will die bewaa dance ground. Meaning: Even though you are beautiful you should not insult people at the bewaa dance (and other places) - you too will die one day. Notes: Use for Bewaa and Kari. (35) Nandomme Ali nu bang bewaa, e gbele kabe. Lit: The people of Nandom Ali (name) knows how to dance bɛwaa, legs no strength. Meaning: Ali from Nandom can dance bɛwaa but has no strength in his legs. Notes: Old song from time the bɛwaa group started written by Alissi. See also Pataasi nyure funayinbie kang yame wa hala (36) Be mone saab be mone saab be kure nuure. Lit: You don't make TZ, you don't make TZ, don't kill chickens. Bekuone Maria makes TZ then kills a chicken for soup. Meaning: When you make TZ you don't need to kill a chicken as you don't eat chicken with TZ. Maria from the Bekuone clan doesn't know how to cook. When she has made TZ she goes to kill a chicken for soup - but only men are allowed to kill chickens. (37) Pogle ter bu kang n zeli o sib (dance). Lit: The girl has something, I beg, she refused. Meaning: The girl has something I want (her favour) but when I begged she refused to give it to me. Notes: Fast bɛwaa. Can go with e.g. Sɛbro bambala wele. This is a dance rather than a song as such. The dance is for lovers and couples together. The words were added later to identify the dance and make the couples laugh. Nkrumah's time. (38) Kpaa ngmaa pogmole ben Tuopare (song & dance). Lit: Ugly person, free girls at Tuoper market. Meaning: If you are ugly or have something wrong with you, you can get a cheap girl to marry at Tuoper market. Notes: An old song composed by people from Guo (1 mile beyond Tuoper from Nandom). Tuoper market was one of the biggest in the area and there were always young men and women there looking for a marriage partner. It was said that there were so many girls that even if you only had 10kobo (Nigerian word for pennies) you could find a girl to marry. Kpaa ngmaa literally means "short back of the head." (39) Pogle ter bu kang n zeli o sib (dance). Lit: The girl has something, I beg, she refused. Meaning: The girl has something I want (her favour) but when I begged she refused to give it to me. Notes: Fast bɛwaa. Can go with e.g. Sɛbro bambala wele. This is a dance rather than a song as such. The dance is for lovers and couples together. The words were added later to identify the dance and make the couples laugh. Nkrumah's time. (40) Bayeluma mimi ya ya, me nyenga kele nyenga, ko wa. Lit: Bayeluma (woman's name from Bekuone clan) has got so many eyes, you see this one, and you see this one again, you should come. Meaning: Bayeluma has a roving eye and will flirt and come if anyone calls.Notes: Old song - Nkrumah's time. Composed by Sangnuo Borro from the old chief's palace (41) Poglinokpagr nu wo zangkpana, wo zangkpana. Lit: A girl who argues has spots on her skin, spots on her skin (repeated), Your forehead long, long, long, long end of the forehead. Meaning: A girl would not take the advice she was offered, she always argued. When she developed a skin rash she was insulted for it, together with her long forehead. Notes: 1960's. The idea for the song came from Bangnido and Ambaa contributed the tune. During the group's journeys to different places the boys and girls would be mocking each other. This song was the result. (42) Wuoyang (man's name) de pog wan pole zebritaar. Lit: Wuoyang has married a woman and the young man are fighting over her. - End - (43) Nandomme biiri ni yangme korkor. Lit: The people of Nandom large population, The enemies pass through and destroy all of them, death, death, death. Meaning: Death comes to everyone. although Nandom has a large population everyone will die at some time. The dancers would be singing, smiling and waving while singing "Death". The song was in memory of one of the group, Kuim Dzang, who was a very good dancer and had recently died although still a pupil at Nandom Secondary school. Notes: Slow bɛwaa. February 1970. Composed by Bangnido? and used as the exit song for many performances. (44) Pogle na dog bie (ter puo) ti kye bulang naa kpi. Lit: The girl who can bear a child (is pregnant) nearly small would have died. Dog skin, pig skin, small pig skin, every skin is a skin. Meaning: Every child, even if it miscarries, is a child just as every animal has a skin. Notes: Someone had sex with a small girl who then became pregnant. When people made fun of him, he replied, every skin is a skin. See also the cassette by Begyil Paul, who claims to have composed it. - End -. (45) M ba kangkanglile, na por kangkang lob me. Lit: My friend kangkang[name of tree] bird, collect the fruit of the kangkang and throw it down to me. Meaning: There is a special bird which nests in the kangkang tree. The man is trying to talk to the bird asking it to throw him some fruit. This is also taken to mean that if you are a good friend, your friends will also help you when you are in need. Notes: Old song from Jirapa (46) Maale yele ke kyaa ter a dong. Lit: You are solving problems and still you have enemies. (47) Vielu daa na Nandomme mi nyu, akuraku. Lit: Very good pito Nandom people drink, wonderful, The rainwater comes, comes, comes and turns to pito then we drink, wonderful Meaning: Self evident! Notes: Not composed by Nandom people! Composed in the early 1960's by people from Tuoper who always enjoyed the Nandom pito when they came to the town. Although akuraku does mean "wonderful" its precise meaning is also "I'm surprised its so good!" (48) Ya ya kole zele. Lit: Keep on begging, (repeated), If she is happy she will give you love Meaning: If you want a woman who is not interested you should keep up your efforts, they may be rewarded with love. Notes: Modern bɛwaa, first heard in Accra in 1986. Doesn't have a dance section associated with it.

  • Description

    Music performed by young Nandom players.

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