Trevor Wiggins Ghana Music Collection

Music for Koriduo played by Alezenda from Nandomkpe

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  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    02:04:41

  • Shelf mark

    C791/1

  • Subjects

    Stringed instruments - plucked - koriduo

  • Recording date

    1994-08-12

  • Is part of (Collection)

    Trevor Wiggins Ghanaian Music Collection

  • Recording locations

    Ghana, Upper West Region, Lambussie-Nandom District

  • Performers

    Alezenda from Nandomkpe (koriduo)

  • Recordist

    Wiggins, Trevor

  • Abstract

    The Koriduo is an old Dagaare instrument, used especially when travelling. Dagaare people used to walk long distances to the south and would carry an instrument with them for entertainment when they stopped to rest. Alezenda made this instrument himself. There are 6 strings which are tuned by twisting a button at one end, thus increasing the tension. Songs: 21) Tuning; Funeral song; Kuuso per jang mi bom (Kuuso, your bottom [anus] is swelling [like a monkey]) composed by someone who had a dispute with Kuuso. 22) Tuning. 23) School children's marching tune. Bolbol worbru yangna tiwaka. (We have come here to eat balls [of kenkey]. Song for school children to march into their classroom - no longer used. 24) Not recognized. 25) Tuning. 26) Funeral tune. Zokpa ma yang migr sie. (Zokpa's mother has tied a rope on her waist). This is done as a signal that someone has died. 27) Tuning. 28) School children's marching tune. Bolbol worbru yangna tiwaka. (We have come here to eat balls [of kenkey]. Song for school children to march into their classroom - no longer used. 29) Bewaa rhythm, bass part but no tune, so not identifiable. 30) Tuning. 31) School children's marching tune. Bolbol worbru yangna tiwaka. (We have come here to eat balls [of kenkey]. Song for school children to march into their classroom - no longer used. 32) Lobi funeral music. First funeral music for a woman. Taa tuli ma kum zie na sop kowa. (Those worms, their grandmother will come in the night.) The worms referred to are seasonal caterpillars, so the implication is that the woman's season has also come.

  • Description

    Music for koriduo, a six stringed Dagaare nstrument.

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User notes for this item

African harmony: Song 1 *the over structure of the first song from 0:30-5:05 is that of parallel dyads played broken, *these broken lines are developed independantly are played polyrhythmicly this creates an inherent pattern. Note: inherent patter - is a pattern that arises out of parts played that itself is never actually played. An illustration would be to draw a dotted line accross a page. Even though they are not a solid line, as a total image the brain preceives them as one line, hence "dotted line" and not "a series of dashes". The closer the dashes are the more the brain preceives them as one line, the further apart the less. This is the principle of proximity. Song 2 *parallel broken dyads are used as the overall structure of the song *these parallel broken dyads are played as harmonizations of a melody as some are played block and others broken. *by focusing on one voice or the other the listener can hear the inherent patterns, the lower voice and upper voice are two separate melodies. *thus this melody is a combination of inherent patterns and parallel dyads harmony

Posted by Daniel Jones, Researcher on 16/03/2019 23:58:00