Peter Kennedy Collection

Barrow on Humber Plough Play, Lincolnshire 1953. Tape 1

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Andrew PaceChorus sings 'The farmer's boy'.
Posted by Andrew Pace on 18/02/2013

Andrew Pace'The courting song' sung with accordion.
Posted by Andrew Pace on 18/02/2013

Andrew PacePlough play begins with "In comes I…".
Posted by Andrew Pace on 18/02/2013

Andrew PaceMale chorus sings 'All jolly fellows that follow the plough' with accordion accompaniment.
Posted by Andrew Pace on 18/02/2013

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[11:50]

Chorus sings 'The farmer's boy'.

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:59:00

[8:18]

'The courting song' sung with accordion.

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:57:00

[1:31]

Plough play begins with "In comes I…".

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:53:00

[0:10]

Male chorus sings 'All jolly fellows that follow the plough' with accordion accompaniment.

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:52:00

Before its revival in 1951 (for the Festival of Britain celebrations), the play had not been performed since 1898 due to an incident with the police.

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:47:00

The Barrow-on-Humber plough play, recorded in Barrow-on-Humber, Lincolnshire in 1953. The play was an annual event comprised of local men acting out a drama which consisted of musical segments, sword dances and a hobby horse.

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:46:00

This is a live performance of the play as revived by Jack Martin of Barrow-on-Humber. Martin reconstructed the play after talking to elderly members of the village.

Posted by Andrew Pace, British Library on 18/02/2013 20:46:00