Oral history of British science

Rothschild, Miriam (10 of 16) An Oral History of British Horticulture

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  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    00:30:22

  • Shelf mark

    C1029/01

  • Subjects

    Zoology

  • Recording date

    2001-10-02

  • Recording locations

    Interviewee's home

  • Interviewees

    Rothschild, Miriam, 1908-2005 (speaker, female)

  • Interviewers

    Brodie, Louise (speaker, female)

  • Abstract

    Part 10: After Stanton left due to being too expensive, they had to make the farm and garden practical concerns. Miriam Rothschild [MR] drove her van taking flowers round to sell. Then she bought a shop and ran it as a business, though she didn't like the selling. She abandoned the commercial side. She visited Holland and Switzerland. Manual labour was reduced by machinery. Details of disputes with the taxman. Contrasts in strawberries of earlier times and now. She had idealistic visions of improving the estate and the village. She was never into politics, and doesn't like party politics, though she spent some time campaigning for cousin James (Liberal). She is left wing rather than right wing. At Plymouth she did all the protection of the laboratory and learnt to shoot. They had 6000 men at Ashton (American airmen) during the War.

  • Description

    Interview with Dame Miriam Rothschild DBE FRS, naturalist and entomologist.

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