Oral history of British science

Klug, Aaron (Part 2 of 31). National Life Stories Collection: General

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  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    00:30:19

  • Shelf mark

    C464/31

  • Subjects

    Biophysics; Chemistry

  • Recording date

    2002-10-29, 2002-11-03, 2002-11-20, 2002-11-27

  • Recording locations

    MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

  • Interviewees

    Klug, Aaron, 1926-, (speaker, male)

  • Interviewers

    Thompson, Katherine (speaker, female)

  • Abstract

    AK talks about his infant school, could read and write when very young, was moved into older brother's class. They got Jewish education by teacher once a week, learned Hebrew. Went to synagogue every Saturday and then to library, got books for the week. AK went to school at 3 and a half, was compulsive reader. Parents spoke Yiddish to each other, English to children. Primary school was mixed up to 13. AK talks about the bush, about blacks and Indians, about monkeys, snakes and other animals in the bush. Talk about hikes through the bush, about shopping and Indian hawkers selling food. About Zulus and the rules regarding them in older times. Talk about Indian films he saw and more about the different coloured people, about their servants, their habits and their language and how they lived near their house. AK's liberal feelings about the natives and more about the Zulus and their life. At age 11 AK went to Durban High School, same class as brother - was very good pupil. School was based on English system but lower level. Latin main subject. Life was not stressed. AK conscious of being member of British Empire, missed being in the Army but did take the oath at 18. Few Jewish children in school had non-Jewish friends.

  • Description

    Nobel Prize-winning chemist Aaron Klug in conversation about his life and work. Klug is most famous for his research into crystallographic electron microscopy.

  • Related links

    Visit this interviewee's page on the 'Voices of Science' web resource

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