BBC Voices

Conversation in Dudley about accent, dialect and attitudes to language.

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Richard CauldwellBrian Dakin tells us that his Dad told him to change his accent when he went to secondary school: When yow go to grammar school you gotta drop your doh's, you gotta drop your cor's, becoss you cor spake like that in grammar school.
Posted by Richard Cauldwell on 15/10/2012

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  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    01:47:29

  • Shelf mark

    C1190/05/02

  • Recording date

    2005-02-27

  • Is part of (Collection)

    BBC Voices Recordings

  • Recording locations

    Dudley, West Midlands

  • Interviewees

    Dakin, Brian, 1952 Nov. 28- (speaker, male, retail manager), Hawthorn, Brendan, 1961 March 12- (speaker, male, museum assistant), O'Dea, Gary, 1962 Jan. 05- (speaker, male, university administrator), Stokes, Greg, 1955 April 14- (speaker, male, clinical chemist)

  • Interviewers

    Towell, Nadine, 1978 Sept. 10- (speaker, female)

  • Producers

    BBC WM

  • Abstract

    [00:00:00] Speakers introduce themselves, describe their family background/education/employment/speech.[00:08:22] Discussion of words used to describe PEOPLE AND THINGS. Mention how speech varies around Black Country area.[00:18:57] Discussion of words used to describe CLOTHING. Mention words used locally for various items of clothing.[00:22:25] Discussion of words used to describe EMOTIONS. Anecdotes about people not understanding local phrase on the box used to mean off sick from work.[00:26:31] Discussion of words used to describe ACTIONS.[00:29:00] Discussion of words used to describe PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES.[00:33:34] Discussion of words used to describe WEATHER AND SURROUNDINGS.[00:36:49] Discussion about Black Country dialect, how it has been shaped by history of area/local industry/geography, Black Country grammar, changing their speech in different situations/when talking to different people in past.[00:43:36] Discussion about future of Black Country dialect, how it is changing, embracing influences from other cultures, using it in poetry. Dialect and social class, close-knit local community, how job prospects depended on your speech in the past, pressure to change speech when attending grammar school as child.[00:51:38] Discussion about other peoples reactions to/assumptions about their speech, how they feel about being mistaken for a Brummy, how people from local area are portrayed in media. Description of creative talent in local area, other peoples attitudes towards local area, identifying as coming from Black Country. Description of how Tipton has been portrayed on various local television news programmes. Discussion about attitudes towards Birmingham, football rivalries, Black Country identity, local industry, pride in local area, meaning of canting.[01:05:13] Discussion about how speech varies within Black Country, possible reasons for this, how this variation relates to location of local industries in past, various features of local speech, people changing their speech, local elders. Description of his grandmother who was a local wise woman in past. Discussion about local sense of humour/values.[01:20:16] Discussion about local community spirit, having to earn the respect of local people.[01:24:49] Discussion about use and meaning of various Black Country words/phrases/expressions, anecdotes about using them. Black Country humour, words related to local industry.[01:34:51] Performance of Black Country dialect poems. Discussion about use of Black Country dialect by local people, local creative arts. Description of Alternative Black Country Show they hosted recently in pub in Dudley, their role as contemporary social commentators/story-tellers.[01:46:21] Discussion about future of Black Country dialect. Speakers re-introduce themselves.

  • Description

    All four interviewees are friends who are proud of having grown up in the Black Country. BBC warning: this interview contains strong or offensive language. Recording made for BBC Voices project of a conversation guided by a BBC interviewer. The conversation follows a loose structure based on eliciting opinions about accents, dialects, the words we use and people's attitude to language.

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User notes for this item

[51:21]

Brian Dakin tells us that his Dad told him to change his accent when he went to secondary school: When yow go to grammar school you gotta drop your doh's, you gotta drop your cor's, becoss you cor spake like that in grammar school.

Posted by Richard Cauldwell, Teacher, Author, Speech in Action on 15/10/2012 13:05:00