Peter Cooke Uganda Collection

Unidentified song

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Kim LannyLastly, the song lacks a captivating climax; where the writer should have included a part for the soloist to sing excitedly about the animal being chased & or captured by this famous hunter. Change of the song's rhyming, rhythm and style could be better than this, modulation would be a better option too. This would build up to a final opportunity for the drummers’ peak to at least a quarter to a half a minute loudness & then end.
Posted by Kim Lanny on 27/05/2014

Kim LannyThe second observation may be partly a recording error on how the mics were positioned, but if not, the drummers were too muffled in their playing. It is a must to lower the effort when the soloist is singing her parts to allow the jury to listen to the wealth of lyrical content, originality & vocal intonations of the song'. Normally the drummers are supposed to lift their sounds a little closer to the loudness of the choir to give beauty to the song.
Posted by Kim Lanny on 27/05/2014

Kim LannyTechnical Stuff: Listen carefully; at the time of the choir's complementing of the soloist, they were late by half a beat. In Musical Competitions, the final score is affected.
Posted by Kim Lanny on 27/05/2014

Kim LannyThe Song: The Song is about a Hunting Legend & the soloist is saying "Here He Comes" (Zimuleese) & the back-up singers are responding to the soloist's joyous exclamation by ululating & confirming that "Yes guys, He Has Come!" In the bridge of the song, the welcomed hunter then starts demanding for his hunting tools like the spear (Effumu) & other items. He summons the dogs to scare and guard the animal (normally antelopes, kobs, buffaloes, impala) towards his direction until he captures or spears it.
Posted by Kim Lanny on 27/05/2014

Kim LannyMost folk songs are sung in a "Question - Answer" format & that's why you hear the soloist sings something & the choir answers back. It is a simple exhibition of the strength of the community as it used to be back in the days. A team was always better than a single hunter, just like a child belonged to the village the much he belonged to his parents. It was communal grooming & protection.
Posted by Kim Lanny on 27/05/2014

Kim LannyThis is a Traditional Folk Song. History: In Uganda, our History was empowered by several types of Folklore & this included legendary stories & fairy tales, proverbs & jokes, music, norms & traditions of tribes & culture. This was mostly done within the Buganda Kingdom, & when this Folklore was not oral it was done musically.
Posted by Kim Lanny on 27/05/2014

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Tags (top 25):
  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    00:02:34

  • Cultures

    Ganda

  • Shelf mark

    C23/28

  • Subjects

    trad. song to baakisimba rhythm

  • Recording date

    1968-07

  • Is part of (Collection)

    Peter Cooke Uganda Recordings

  • Recording locations

    Kyambogo National Teachers' College, Kyambogo Hill, Nsambya, Uganda

  • Performance occasion

    Uganda Music Festival Competition

  • Performers

    Namirembe Primary School group, Unidentified (drums), Unidentified (singers, children)

  • Recordist

    Busuulwa, Bulasio for Peter Cooke

  • Description

    Item note: Traditional song to baakisimba rhythm. Part of the Uganda Music Festival 1968 held at Kyambogo national teachers' College. Primary schools traditional song competition. Performance note: With drums and hand claps; this With some harmony in chorus and chanted in parts. Recording note: Recorded on Uher, half-track at 3 3/4ips. Recordist's note: In Peter Cooke's notes, this is PCUG64-8.41.A7.

  • Metadata record:

    View full metadata for this item

User notes for this item

[2:01]

Lastly, the song lacks a captivating climax; where the writer should have included a part for the soloist to sing excitedly about the animal being chased & or captured by this famous hunter. Change of the song's rhyming, rhythm and style could be better than this, modulation would be a better option too. This would build up to a final opportunity for the drummers’ peak to at least a quarter to a half a minute loudness & then end.

Posted by Kim Lanny, Musical Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:58:00

[1:23]

The second observation may be partly a recording error on how the mics were positioned, but if not, the drummers were too muffled in their playing. It is a must to lower the effort when the soloist is singing her parts to allow the jury to listen to the wealth of lyrical content, originality & vocal intonations of the song'. Normally the drummers are supposed to lift their sounds a little closer to the loudness of the choir to give beauty to the song.

Posted by Kim Lanny, Music Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:56:00

[0:53]

Technical Stuff: Listen carefully; at the time of the choir's complementing of the soloist, they were late by half a beat. In Musical Competitions, the final score is affected.

Posted by Kim Lanny, Music Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:55:00

[0:26]

The Song: The Song is about a Hunting Legend & the soloist is saying "Here He Comes" (Zimuleese) & the back-up singers are responding to the soloist's joyous exclamation by ululating & confirming that "Yes guys, He Has Come!" In the bridge of the song, the welcomed hunter then starts demanding for his hunting tools like the spear (Effumu) & other items. He summons the dogs to scare and guard the animal (normally antelopes, kobs, buffaloes, impala) towards his direction until he captures or spears it.

Posted by Kim Lanny, Music Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:54:00

[0:21]

Most folk songs are sung in a "Question - Answer" format & that's why you hear the soloist sings something & the choir answers back. It is a simple exhibition of the strength of the community as it used to be back in the days. A team was always better than a single hunter, just like a child belonged to the village the much he belonged to his parents. It was communal grooming & protection.

Posted by Kim Lanny, Musical Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:51:00

[0:01]

This is a Traditional Folk Song. History: In Uganda, our History was empowered by several types of Folklore & this included legendary stories & fairy tales, proverbs & jokes, music, norms & traditions of tribes & culture. This was mostly done within the Buganda Kingdom, & when this Folklore was not oral it was done musically.

Posted by Kim Lanny, Musical Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:50:00

This is a Traditional Folk Song. History: In Uganda, our History was empowered by several types of Folklore & this included legendary stories & fairy tales, proverbs & jokes, music, norms & traditions of tribes & culture. This was mostly done within the Buganda Kingdom, & when this Folklore was not oral it was done musically. Most folk songs are sung in a "Question - Answer" format & that's why you hear the soloist sings something & the choir answers back. It is a simple exhibition of the strength of the community as it used to be back in the days. A team was always better than a single hunter, just like a child belonged to the village the much he belonged to his parents. It was communal grooming & protection. The Song: The Song is about a Hunting Legend & the soloist is saying "Here He Comes" (Zimuleese) & the back-up singers are responding to the soloist's joyous exclamation by ululating & confirming that "Yes guys, He Has Come!" In the bridge of the song, the welcomed hunter then starts demanding for his hunting tools like the spear (Effumu) & other items. Technical Stuff: Listen carefully; at the time of the choir's complementing of the soloist, they were late by half a beat. The second observation, the drummers were too muffled in their playing. It is a must to lower the effort when the soloist is singing her parts to allow the jury to listen to the wealth of lyrical content, originality & vocal intonations of the song'. Normally the drummers are supposed to lift their sounds a little closer to the loudness of the choir to give beauty to the song. Lastly, the song lucks a climax; where the writer should have included a part for the soloist to sing about the animal being chased & or captured by this famous hunter.

Posted by Lanny Galikuwa KIMBOWA, Musical Analysis, Diverse on 27/05/2014 18:47:00

Unidentified song

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