Opie collection of children's games & songs

Recording of children demonstrating songs and discussing playground games with Iona Opie and an interview with Frances Smith from North Carolina, USA (part 3 of 4)

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  • Type

    sound

  • Duration

    00:15:35

  • Shelf mark

    C898/02

  • Subjects

    Children's games; Children's songs

  • Recording date

    1975-07

  • Is part of (Collection)

    Opie collection of children's games and songs

  • Recording locations

    London, England

  • Interviewees

    Smith, Frances (speaker, female)

  • Interviewers

    Opie, Iona (speaker, female)

  • Speakers

    unidentified (children)

  • Abstract

    Part 3 of 4. [00:00:00 - 00:15:35] This recording continues to interview girls from London's American School who perform clapping, skipping and singing games for Iona Opie. The recording begins with the girls performing a clapping rhyme, although some of the words are inaudible. They can in parts be heard singing: 'bug-buggy-wattan-tattan' [00:00:00 - 00:00:55]. Another clapping song performed is 'See, See My Playmate' and one of the girls explains that she learnt this rhyme while living in New York. Iona remarks that she believes the song is of American origin and has only begun to become popular in England [00:00:56 - 00:01:37]. The children go on to perform 'Miss Susie Had a Baby' [00:02:46 - 00:03:39] and [00:03:39 - 00:05:45], and 'Eeny, Meeny, Destameeny', although the words are difficult to decipher [00:05:47 - 00:07:54]. The children sing a number of skipping rhymes throughout the recording. These include 'Skip to my Lou' [00:07:55 - 00:09:04], 'Salt, Vinegar, Pepper' [00:09:14 - 00:09:46] and 'Cinderella, Dressed in Yellow' [00:09:47 - 00:10:44] and [00:13:26 - 00:13:41]. Alongside the skipping and clapping games, a variety of singing games are performed, along with pop and folk songs. The first singing game, 'I am a Gold Key', is also used as a word riddle and ends with the child stating: 'I am a monkey!' [00:12:47 - 00:13:22]. Other singing games performed include 'Old King Glory' [00:13:42 - 00:14:02] and [00:14:28 - 00:15:16], and the children discuss 'Came a Duke a-Riding' [00:12:30 - 00:12:46]. One of the children present in the interview interrupts Iona at one point and asks to perform a song that she and her friend have learnt. This is the pop song 'Put Another Nickel In (Music, Music, Music)' [00:01:57 - 00:02:46]. Another girl also performs the song 'Somebody Waiting' [00:14:03 - 00:14:27]. The tape finishes with one of the schoolgirls asking Iona: 'what's your name' and 'who told you to come here?' before running back to class.

  • Description

    Item notes: Recording of children demonstrating songs and discussing playground games with Iona Opie and an interview with Frances Smith from North Carolina, USA. Speakers' notes: Group of London schoolchildren. Interviewee's notes: Frances Smith from North Carolina, USA. Recording notes: Rumble (presumed motor noise) from 00:02-00:09 (approx.) and 15:49 (approx.)-end. Otherwise good throughout.

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